Insulin reduces serum glycosylphosphatidylinositol phospholipase D levels in human type I diabetic patients and streptozotocin diabetic rats.


Schofield, JN; Stephens, JW; Hurel, SJ; Bell, KM; de Souza, JB; Rademacher, TW; (2002) Insulin reduces serum glycosylphosphatidylinositol phospholipase D levels in human type I diabetic patients and streptozotocin diabetic rats. Molecular genetics and metabolism, 75 (2). pp. 154-61. ISSN 1096-7192 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1006/mgme.2001.3287

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The enzyme glycosylphosphatidylinositol phospholipase D has a postulated role in the insulin-mimetic signaling pathway of glycosylphosphatidylinositol compounds. We have investigated enzyme activity in the serum of human type I diabetic patients and plasma and tissues of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats following insulin administration. In the human diabetic patients serum enzyme activity fell by an average of 10.6% (SEM = 2.7; P = 0.008; n = 20) following administration of insulin. In addition serum enzyme activity appeared to be depleted by 27% (SEM = 8.8; P = 0.011; n = 10) compared to nondiabetic controls. In untreated diabetic rats plasma enzyme activity gradually increased 0.3-fold over a 6-week period (P < 0.001; n = 8), this increase was reversed and activity normalized when these animals were treated with insulin. Cloning of the rat glycosylphosphatidylinositol phospholipase D cDNA enabled confirmation of the liver as the principal organ of synthesis. Analysis of mRNA levels in the livers of the diabetic rats showed that gene expression was reduced in the insulin-treated animals compared to the noninsulin-treated controls by 0.7-fold (P = 0.004; n = 4). Tissue enzyme activity was also reduced in the insulin-treated rats; in skeletal muscle enzyme activity was 0.3-fold lower (P = 0.001; n = 4). Insulin therefore decreases glycosylphosphatidylinositol phospholipase D synthesis in diabetic animals resulting in decreased serum enzyme levels, suggesting a relationship between this enzyme and the function of insulin.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Immunology and Infection
PubMed ID: 11855934
Web of Science ID: 174355300007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/6906

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
257Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item