Analyses of the 1957 (Asian) influenza pandemic in the United Kingdom and the impact of school closures


Vynnycky, E; Edmunds, WJ; (2008) Analyses of the 1957 (Asian) influenza pandemic in the United Kingdom and the impact of school closures. Epidemiology and infection, 136 (2). pp. 166-79. ISSN 0950-2688 DOI: 10.1017/S0950268807008369

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Abstract

Many countries plan to close schools during a future influenza pandemic, although the potential impact is poorly understood. We apply a model of the transmission dynamics of pandemic influenza to consultation, serological and clinical data from the United Kingdom from the 1957 (Asian) influenza pandemic, to estimate the basic reproduction number (R0), the proportion of infected individuals who experience clinical symptoms and the impact of school/nursery closures. The R0 for Asian influenza was about 1.8 and 60-65% of infected individuals were estimated to have experienced clinical symptoms. During a future pandemic, closure of schools/nurseries could reduce the epidemic size only by a very small amount (<10%) if R0 is high (e.g. 2.5 or 3.5), and modest reductions, e.g. 22% might be possible if it is low (1.8) and schools are closed early, depending on assumptions about contact patterns. Further data on contact patterns and their dependence on school closures are needed.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Basic Reproduction Number, Child, Child, Preschool, Communicable Disease Control/*methods, *Disease Outbreaks, Great Britain/epidemiology, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Influenza, Human/*epidemiology/prevention & control/transmission, Middle Aged, Models, Statistical, *Schools, Time Factors, Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Basic Reproduction Number, Child, Child, Preschool, Communicable Disease Control, methods, Disease Outbreaks, Great Britain, epidemiology, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Influenza, Human, epidemiology, prevention & control, transmission, Middle Aged, Models, Statistical, Schools, Time Factors
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
PubMed ID: 17445311
Web of Science ID: 259337000003
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/6826

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