Non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries: context, determinants and health policy.


Miranda, JJ; Kinra, S; Casas, JP; Davey Smith, G; Ebrahim, S; (2008) Non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries: context, determinants and health policy. Tropical medicine & international health, 13 (10). pp. 1225-34. ISSN 1360-2276 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3156.2008.02116.x

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Abstract

The rise of non-communicable diseases and their impact in low- and middle-income countries has gained increased attention in recent years. However, the explanation for this rise is mostly an extrapolation from the history of high-income countries whose experience differed from the development processes affecting today's low- and middle-income countries. This review appraises these differences in context to gain a better understanding of the epidemic of non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries. Theories of developmental and degenerative determinants of non-communicable diseases are discussed to provide strong evidence for a causally informed approach to prevention. Health policies for non-communicable diseases are considered in terms of interventions to reduce population risk and individual susceptibility and the research needs for low- and middle-income countries are discussed. Finally, the need for health system reform to strengthen primary care is highlighted as a major policy to reduce the toll of this rising epidemic.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 18937743
Web of Science ID: 259914100002
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/6752

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