Two Leishmania species circulating in the Kaleybar focus of infantile visceral leishmaniasis, northwest Iran: implications for deltamethrin dog collar intervention


Parvizi, P; Mazloumi-Gavgani, AS; Davies, CR; Courtenay, O; Ready, PD; (2008) Two Leishmania species circulating in the Kaleybar focus of infantile visceral leishmaniasis, northwest Iran: implications for deltamethrin dog collar intervention. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 102 (9). pp. 891-897. ISSN 0035-9203 DOI: 10.1016/j.trstmh.2008.04.026

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

Leishmania infantum is the causative agent of infantile visceral leishmaniasis (IVL) in the Mediterranean Basin and, based on isoenzyme typing of a few isolates from patients and domestic dogs, this parasite was considered to predominate in the Kaleybar focus of IVL in northwest Iran. However, in the current investigation only one out of five sandfly infections was found to be L. infantum, based on PCR detection and sequencing of parasite internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA infecting Phlebotomus perfiliewi transcaucasicus. The four other infections were of haplotypes of L. tropica, the causative agent of anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Middle East and a parasite occasionally detected in the viscera of dogs and patients in Iran and elsewhere. The widespread distribution of L. tropica in the Kaleybar focus suggests that this parasite is not a transient introduction. Kaleybar has been used for a deltamethrin dog collar intervention to reduce the biting rates of the vectors of L. infantum and this has significantly reduced the incidence of Leishmania infections both in children and the domestic dog, the usual reservoir host of IVL. The implications of finding L. tropica widespread in the heart of the intervention area are discussed. Extensive and intensive typing of natural Leishmania infections is a characteristic of epidemiological investigations in the Neotropics and the current report indicates that this will also be necessary in some regions of the Old World. (C) 2008 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Research Centre: Leishmaniasis Group
PubMed ID: 18554675
Web of Science ID: 259461600009
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/6586

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
290Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item