The Potential Contribution of Mass Treatment to the Control of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria


Okell, LC; Griffin, JT; Kleinschmidt, I; Hollingsworth, TD; Churcher, TS; White, MJ; Bousema, T; Drakeley, CJ; Ghani, AC; (2011) The Potential Contribution of Mass Treatment to the Control of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria. PLoS One, 6 (5). ISSN 1932-6203 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0020179

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
License:

Download (479kB) | Preview

Abstract

Mass treatment as a means to reducing P. falciparum malaria transmission was used during the first global malaria eradication campaign and is increasingly being considered for current control programmes. We used a previously developed mathematical transmission model to explore both the short and long-term impact of possible mass treatment strategies in different scenarios of endemic transmission. Mass treatment is predicted to provide a longer-term benefit in areas with lower malaria transmission, with reduced transmission levels for at least 2 years after mass treatment is ended in a scenario where the baseline slide-prevalence is 5%, compared to less than one year in a scenario with baseline slide-prevalence at 50%. However, repeated annual mass treatment at 80% coverage could achieve around 25% reduction in infectious bites in moderate-to-high transmission settings if sustained. Using vector control could reduce transmission to levels at which mass treatment has a longer-term impact. In a limited number of settings ( which have isolated transmission in small populations of 1000-10,000 with low-to-medium levels of baseline transmission) we find that five closely spaced rounds of mass treatment combined with vector control could make at least temporary elimination a feasible goal. We also estimate the effects of using gametocytocidal treatments such as primaquine and of restricting treatment to parasite-positive individuals. In conclusion, mass treatment needs to be repeated or combined with other interventions for long-term impact in many endemic settings. The benefits of mass treatment need to be carefully weighed against the risks of increasing drug selection pressure.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: INFECTIOUS TRACHOMA, GAMETOCYTE CARRIAGE, RESISTANT MALARIA, ENDEMIC, AREA, TRANSMISSION, ARTEMISININ, ELIMINATION, COMMUNITIES, PRIMAQUINE, REDUCTION
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Immunology and Infection
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
Tropical Epidemiology Group
PubMed ID: 21629651
Web of Science ID: 291005800031
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/646

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
201Downloads
313Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item