Effect of vitamin A supplementation on cause-specific mortality in women of reproductive age in Ghana: a secondary analysis from the ObaapaVitA trial.


Hurt, L; Ten Asbroek, A; Amenga-Etego, S; Zandoh, C; Danso, S; Edmond, K; Hurt, C; Tawiah, C; Hill, Z; Fenty, J; Owusu-Agyei, S; Campbell, OM; Kirkwood, BR; (2013) Effect of vitamin A supplementation on cause-specific mortality in women of reproductive age in Ghana: a secondary analysis from the ObaapaVitA trial. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 91 (1). pp. 19-27. ISSN 0042-9686 DOI: 10.2471/BLT.11.100412

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of weekly low-dose vitamin A supplementation on cause-specific mortality in women of reproductive age in Ghana. METHODS A cluster-randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in seven districts of the Brong Ahafo region of Ghana. Women aged 15-45 years who were capable of giving informed consent and intended to live in the trial area for at least 3 months were enrolled and randomly assigned, according to their cluster of residence, to receive oral vitamin A (7500 μg) or placebo once a week. Randomization was blocked, with two clusters in each fieldwork area allocated to vitamin A and two to placebo. Every 4 weeks, fieldworkers distributed capsules and collected data during home visits. Verbal autopsies were conducted by field supervisors and reviewed by physicians, who assigned a cause of death. Cause-specific mortality rates in both arms were compared by means of random-effects Poisson regression models to allow for the cluster randomization. Analysis was by intention-to-treat, based on cluster of residence, with women eligible for inclusion once they had consistently received the supplement or placebo capsules for 6 months. FINDINGS The analysis was based on 581 870 woman-years and 2624 deaths. Cause-specific mortality rates were found to be similar in the two study arms. CONCLUSION Low-dose vitamin A supplements administered weekly are of no benefit in programmes to reduce mortality in women of childbearing age. Abstract available from the publisher.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
Maternal and Child Health Intervention Research Group
Maternal Health Group
Population Studies Group
Tropical Epidemiology Group
PubMed ID: 23397347
Web of Science ID: 313756400007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/630519

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