Activation by malaria antigens renders mononuclear cells susceptible to HIV infection and re-activates replication of endogenous HIV in cells from HIV-infected adults


Froebel, K; Howard, W; Schafer, JR; Howie, F; Whitworth, J; Kaleebu, P; Brown, AL; Riley, E; (2004) Activation by malaria antigens renders mononuclear cells susceptible to HIV infection and re-activates replication of endogenous HIV in cells from HIV-infected adults. Parasite immunology, 26 (5). pp. 213-217. ISSN 0141-9838 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.0141-9838.2004.00701.x

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Abstract

We have tested the hypothesis that activation of T cells by exposure to malaria antigens facilitates both de novo HIV infection and viral reactivation and replication. PBMC from malaria-naive HIV-uninfected European donors could be productively infected with HIV following in vitro stimulation with a lysate of Plasmodium falciparum schizonts and PBMC from malaria-naive and malaria-exposed (semi-immune) HIV-positive adults were induced to produce higher levels of virus after stimulation with the same malaria extract. These findings suggest that effective malaria control measures might con-tribute to reducing the spread of HIV and extending the life span of HIV-infected individuals living in malaria endemic areas.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: HIV, malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS, PLASMODIUM-FALCIPARUM, UGANDA, Adult, Animals, Antigens, Protozoan, immunology, HIV Core Protein p24, immunology, HIV Infections, complications, immunology, virology, HIV-1, immunology, physiology, Humans, Interferon Type II, immunology, Lymphocyte Activation, immunology, Malaria, Falciparum, immunology, parasitology, Middle Aged, Plasmodium falciparum, immunology, T-Lymphocytes, immunology, virology, Virus Replication, immunology
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Immunology and Infection
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 15491470
Web of Science ID: 224521700002
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/6217

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