Cross-Cultural Communication and Co-ethnic Social Networks: Perspectives and Practices of Independent Community Pharmacists in Urban Britain.


Duckett, K; (2013) Cross-Cultural Communication and Co-ethnic Social Networks: Perspectives and Practices of Independent Community Pharmacists in Urban Britain. Medical anthropology, 32 (2). pp. 145-59. ISSN 0145-9740 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/01459740.2012.701255

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Abstract

Despite the role of the pharmacist in the delivery of community health care, anthropological research placing them at the center of enquiry has been limited. In this article, I explore the experience of independent community pharmacists in hyperdiverse, urban communities. Research was conducted in East and South-East London, combining participant observation within pharmacies and active interviews with pharmacists. Pharmacists' narratives highlighted a sense of closeness to the lifeworld concerns of customers. They identified their ability to use cultural capital to build relationships through the delivery of successful cross-cultural care and by acting as brokers or patrons within co-ethnic social networks. Pharmacists position themselves as communication 'experts,' employ multilingual staff, and stock less commonly available products to provide a 'specialist' service for customers in hyperdiverse communities. I suggest that the pharmacy is a neglected space, and demonstrate how the autonomy afforded by independent practice provides a flexible and inclusive approach.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Health Services Research and Policy
PubMed ID: 23406065
Web of Science ID: 314868200004
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/615540

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