Costs of Meningitis Sequelae in Children in Dakar, Senegal.


Griffiths, UK; Dieye, Y; Fleming, J; Hajjeh, R; Edmond, K; (2012) Costs of Meningitis Sequelae in Children in Dakar, Senegal. The Pediatric infectious disease journal, 31 (11). e189-95. ISSN 0891-3668 DOI: 10.1097/INF.0b013e3182615297

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Survivors of bacterial meningitis risk lifelong sequelae. In economic evaluations of vaccines protecting against meningitis, treatment and productivity costs due to meningitis sequelae are rarely included in studies from low-income countries, mainly due to lack of data. The aim of this study was to estimate the costs of meningitis sequelae in children in Senegal from the perspective of households.<br/> METHODS: Children who had suffered from bacterial meningitis were identified from a database at Albert Royer Hospital in Dakar. Sixty-eight children were located at their home and caregivers interviewed about costs during the acute meningitis episode and due to meningitis sequelae, including productivity loss from caring for a disabled child. Lifetime costs were predicted by assuming a life expectancy of 30 years for disabled children.<br/> RESULTS: Seventy-one percent of the children had either minor or major sequelae. Mean discounted lifetime sequelae costs amounted to US$ 34,895 (95% confidence interval: US$ 67-96,755) per child. Discounted childcare costs amounted to US$ 3158 (9%), treatment costs US$ 460 (1%) and productivity costs US$ 31,276 (90%). No children were receiving rehabilitation services by the time the study was conducted.<br/> CONCLUSION: The present study is the first to present data on household costs from families with disabled children in a low-income country setting. Caring for a disabled child is a considerable financial as well as emotional burden for the individual family. None of the families could afford the treatment they desired for their child.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 22668806
Web of Science ID: 310532000001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/57803

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