Influence of Wasting and Stunting at the Onset of the Rainy Season on Subsequent Malaria Morbidity among Rural Preschool Children in Senegal


Fillol, F; Cournil, A; Boulanger, D; Cisse, B; Sokhna, C; Targett, G; Trape, JF; Simondon, F; Greenwood, B; Simondon, KB; (2009) Influence of Wasting and Stunting at the Onset of the Rainy Season on Subsequent Malaria Morbidity among Rural Preschool Children in Senegal. The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene, 80 (2). pp. 202-208. ISSN 0002-9637

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Abstract

In sub-Saharan Africa, malaria and malnutrition are major causes of morbidity and mortality in children less than five years of age. To explore the impact of malnutrition on subsequent susceptibility to malaria, a cohort of 874 rural preschool children in Senegal was followed-up during one malaria transmission season from July through December. Data on nutritional status and Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia were collected at baseline. Malaria morbidity was monitored through weekly home visits. Wasted children (weight-for-height z-score < -2) were at lower risk of having at least one subsequent clinical malaria attack (odds ratio = 0.33; 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.81, P = 0.02), whereas stunting (height-for-age z-score < -2) or being underweight (weight-for-age z-score < -2) was not associated with clinical malaria. Although non-biological explanations such as overprotection of wasted children by their mothers should be considered, immunomodulation according to nutritional status could explain the lower risk of malaria attack among wasted children.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Animals, Child, Preschool, Female, Growth Disorders, complications, epidemiology, Humans, Infant, Malaria, Falciparum, complications, epidemiology, Male, Malnutrition, complications, Morbidity, Nutritional Status, Parasitemia, complications, epidemiology, Plasmodium falciparum, Prevalence, Rain, Risk Factors, Rural Population, Seasons, Senegal, epidemiology, Wasting Syndrome, complications, epidemiology
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Immunology and Infection
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
PubMed ID: 19190214
Web of Science ID: 263312000010
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/5515

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