Humoral and cell-mediated immunity to MSP3 peptides in adults immunized with MSP3 in malaria endemic area, Burkina Faso.


Nebie, I; Diarra, A; Ouedraogo, A; Tiono, AB; Konate, AT; Gansane, A; Soulama, I; Cousens, S; Leroy, O; Sirima, SB; (2009) Humoral and cell-mediated immunity to MSP3 peptides in adults immunized with MSP3 in malaria endemic area, Burkina Faso. Parasite immunology, 31 (8). pp. 474-80. ISSN 0141-9838 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3024.2009.01130.x

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Abstract

We performed a single-blind, randomized phase 1 trial of the long synthetic peptide (LSP) of merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP3) in adults living in Burkina Faso. Thirty eligible volunteers were randomized to receive either the MSP3-LSP candidate vaccine or tetanus toxoid vaccine as a control. A dose of each vaccine was administered on days 0, 28 and 112 and the vaccine was formulated with aluminium hydroxide. Humoral immune responses were assessed by ELISA at days 0, 28, 56, 112, 140, 252 and 365 and cell-mediated immune responses by lymphoproliferation assay and by ELISA on days 0, 56 and 140. IgG responses to four peptides of MSP3 were similar in both vaccine groups. Higher IgG concentrations were recorded after the beginning of malaria high transmission season in both vaccine groups. The lymphocyte proliferation and the production of IFN-gamma in response to stimulation with the four overlapping peptides increased following vaccination in the MSP3-LSP vaccine group, but did not change appreciably in the control group. In contrast to natural infection, MSP3-LSP did not boost humoral responses to the four overlapping peptides of MSP3 to any detectable degree in our semi-immune adult. MSP3-LSP may be more immunogenic in young children with little or no acquired immunity.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
Tropical Epidemiology Group
PubMed ID: 19646212
Web of Science ID: 267884900007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/5059

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