Migration and tuberculosis transmission in a middle-income country: a cross-sectional study in a central area of São Paulo, Brazil.


Pescarini, JM; Simonsen, V; Ferrazoli, L; Rodrigues, LC; Oliveira, RS; Waldman, EA; Houben, R; (2018) Migration and tuberculosis transmission in a middle-income country: a cross-sectional study in a central area of São Paulo, Brazil. BMC medicine, 16 (1). p. 62. ISSN 1741-7015 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1055-1

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Abstract

Little is known about the impact of growing migration on the pattern of tuberculosis (TB) transmission in middle-income countries. We estimated TB recent transmission and its associated factors and investigated the presence of cross-transmission between South American migrants and Brazilians. We studied a convenient sample of cases of people with pulmonary TB in a central area of São Paulo, Brazil, diagnosed between 2013 and 2014. Cases with similar restriction fragment length polymorphism (IS6110-RFLP) patterns of their Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates were grouped in clusters (recent transmission). Clusters with both Brazilian and South American migrants were considered mixed (cross-transmission). Risk factors for recent transmission were studied using logistic regression. Isolates from 347 cases were included, 76.7% from Brazilians and 23.3% from South American migrants. Fifty clusters were identified, which included 43% South American migrants and 60.2% Brazilians (odds ratio = 0.50, 95% confidence interval = 0.30-0.83). Twelve cross-transmission clusters were identified, involving 24.6% of all clustered cases and 13.8% of all genotyped cases, with migrants accounting for either an equal part or fewer cases in 11/12 mixed clusters. Our results suggest that TB disease following recent transmission is more common among Brazilians, especially among those belonging to high-risk groups, such as drug users. Cross-transmission between migrants and Brazilians was present, but we found limited contributions from migrants to Brazilians in central areas of São Paulo and vice versa.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: TB Centre
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PubMed ID: 29706130
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4647582

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