Additional Screening and Treatment of Malaria During Pregnancy Provides Further Protection Against Malaria and Nonmalarial Fevers During the First Year of Life.


Natama, HM; Rovira-Vallbona, E; Sorgho, H; Somé, MA; Traoré-Coulibaly, M; Scott, S; Zango, SH; Sawadogo, O; Zongo, SC; Valéa, I; Mens, PF; Schallig, HDFH; Kestens, L; Tinto, H; Rosanas-Urgell, A; (2018) Additional Screening and Treatment of Malaria During Pregnancy Provides Further Protection Against Malaria and Nonmalarial Fevers During the First Year of Life. The Journal of infectious diseases. ISSN 0022-1899 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiy140

[img] Text - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 15 March 2019.
License:

Download (543kB)
[img] Text - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Repository staff only until 15 March 2019.
License:

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Although consensus exists that malaria in pregnancy (MiP) increases the risk of malaria in infancy, and eventually nonmalarial fevers (NMFs), there is a lack of conclusive evidence of benefits of MiP preventive strategies in infants. In Burkina Faso, a birth cohort study was nested to a clinical trial assessing the effectiveness of a community-based scheduled screening and treatment of malaria in combination with intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (CSST/IPTp-SP) to prevent placental malaria. Clinical episodes and asymptomatic infections were monitored over 1 year of follow-up to compare the effect of CSST/IPTp-SP and standard IPTp-SP on malaria and NMFs. Infants born during low-transmission season from mothers receiving CSST/IPTp-SP had a 26% decreased risk of experiencing a first clinical episode (hazard ratio, 0.74 [95% confidence interval, .55-0.99]; P = .047). CSST/IPTp-SP interacted with birth season and gravidity to reduce the incidence of NMFs. No significant effects of CSST/IPTp-SP on the incidence of clinical episodes, parasite density, and Plasmodium falciparum infections were observed. Our findings indicate that CSST/IPTp-SP strategy may provide additional protection against both malaria and NMFs in infants during the first year of life, and suggest that malaria control interventions during pregnancy could have long-term benefits in infants.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 29659897
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4647377

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
1Download
20Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item