A Cluster-Randomized Trial to Evaluate the Impact of an Inclusive, Community-Led Total Sanitation Intervention on Sanitation Access for People with Disabilities in Malawi


Biran, A; Danquah, L; Chunga, J; Schmidt, W; Holm, R; Itimu-Phiri, A; Singini, W; Jones, H; Kuper, H; White, S; (2018) A Cluster-Randomized Trial to Evaluate the Impact of an Inclusive, Community-Led Total Sanitation Intervention on Sanitation Access for People with Disabilities in Malawi. The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene. ISSN 0002-9637 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.17-0435

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Abstract

Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) is a common method for promoting sanitation in low-income settings. This cluster-randomized trial evaluated an intervention to improve inclusion of people with disability in CLTS through training facilitators. A qualitative study examined intervention acceptability. The trial included 171 disabled people (78 control and 93 intervention) living in 15 intervention and 15 control communities. In the intervention arm, respondents were more likely to participate in a community meeting about sanitation (+18.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.2, 34.2) and to have been visited to discuss sanitation (+19.7, 95% CI: 0.6, 37.8). More intervention households improved latrine access for the disabled member (+9%, CI: −3.1, 21.0). Inclusive CLTS could improve sanitation access for people with disability but requires support to households beyond that provided in this trial.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: International Centre for Eye Health
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PubMed ID: 29405106
Web of Science ID: 430958200007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4647091

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