Drivers of advanced stage at breast cancer diagnosis in the multi-country African Breast Cancer - Disparities in Outcomes (ABC-DO) study.


McKenzie, F; Zietsman, A; Galukande, M; Anele, A; Adisa, C; Parham, G; Pinder, L; Cubasch, H; Joffe, M; Kidaaga, F; Lukande, R; Offiah, AU; Egejuru, RO; Shibemba, A; Schuz, J; Anderson, BO; Dos Santos Silva, I; McCormack, V; (2017) Drivers of advanced stage at breast cancer diagnosis in the multi-country African Breast Cancer - Disparities in Outcomes (ABC-DO) study. International journal of cancer Journal international du cancer. ISSN 0020-7136 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.31187

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Abstract

Breast cancer (BC) survival rates in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are low in part due to advanced stage at diagnosis. As one component of a study of the entire journey of SSA women with BC, we aimed to identify shared and setting-specific drivers of advanced stage BC. Women newly diagnosed in the multi-country African Breast Cancer - Disparities in Outcomes (ABC-DO) study completed a baseline interview and their stage information was extracted from medical records. Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for advanced stage (I, II, III, IV) in relation to individual woman-level, referral and biological factors. A total of 1795 women were included from Nigeria, Uganda, Zambia, and the multi-racial populations of Namibia and South Africa, 1091 of whom (61%) were stage III/IV. Stage was lower in women with greater BC knowledge (OR 0.77 (95% CI: 0.70, 0.85) per point on a 6 point scale). More advanced stage was associated with being black (4.00 (2.79, 5.74)), having attended <secondary education (1.75 (1.42, 2.16)), having never heard of BC (1.64 (1.31, 2.06)), an unskilled job (1.77 (1.43, 2.20)), and pregnancy in the past 3 years (30% of ≤45 year olds) (1.63 (1.15, 2.31)), and were mediated through delays to diagnosis: symptom duration of ≥ 1 year (OR 2.47 (1.93, 3.15)). These findings provide further evidence that late stage BC in SSA is largely attributed to modifiable factors and strategies to improve BC education and awareness in women and the health system should be intensified. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
PubMed ID: 29197068
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4645551

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