The Level and Duration of RSV-Specific Maternal IgG in Infants in Kilifi Kenya


Ochola, R; Sande, C; Fegan, G; Scott, PD; Medley, GF; Cane, PA; Nokes, DJ; (2009) The Level and Duration of RSV-Specific Maternal IgG in Infants in Kilifi Kenya. PLoS One, 4 (12). ISSN 1932-6203 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0008088

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Abstract

Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants. The rate of decay of RSV-specific maternal antibodies (RSV-matAb), the factors affecting cord blood levels, and the relationship between these levels and protection from infection are poorly defined. Methods: A birth cohort (n = 635) in rural Kenya, was studied intensively to monitor infections and describe age-related serological characteristics. RSV specific IgG antibody (Ab) in serum was measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in cord blood, consecutive samples taken 3 monthly, and in paired acute and convalescent samples. A linear regression model was used to calculate the rate of RSV-matAb decline. The effect of risk factors on cord blood titres was investigated. Results: The half-life of matAb in the Kenyan cohort was calculated to be 79 days (95% confidence limits (CL): 76-81 days). Ninety seven percent of infants were born with RSV-matAb. Infants who subsequently experienced an infection in early life had significantly lower cord titres of anti-RSV Ab in comparison to infants who did not have any incident infection in the first 6 months (P = 0.011). RSV infections were shown to have no effect on the rate of decay of RSV-matAb. Conclusion: Maternal-specific RSV Ab decline rapidly following birth. However, we provide evidence of protection against severe disease by RSV-matAb during the first 6-7 months. This suggests that boosting maternal-specific Ab by RSV vaccination may be a useful strategy to consider.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: respiratory syncytial virus, rural area, infection, antibodies, mozambique, risk, age, hospitalization, immunization, epidemiology
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
PubMed ID: 19956576
Web of Science ID: 272828800008
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4341

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