Negative Correlation between Circulating CD4(+)FOXP3(+)CD127(-) Regulatory T Cells and Subsequent Antibody Responses to Infant Measles Vaccine but Not Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine Implies a Regulatory Role.


Ndure, J; Noho-Konteh, F; Adetifa, JU; Cox, M; Barker, F; Le, MT; Sanyang, LC; Drammeh, A; Whittle, HC; Clarke, E; Plebanski, M; Rowland-Jones, SL; Flanagan, KL; (2017) Negative Correlation between Circulating CD4(+)FOXP3(+)CD127(-) Regulatory T Cells and Subsequent Antibody Responses to Infant Measles Vaccine but Not Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine Implies a Regulatory Role. Front Immunol, 8. p. 921. ISSN 1664-3224 DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2017.00921

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
License:

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a key homeostatic role by suppressing immune responses. They have been targeted in mouse and human cancer studies to improve vaccine immunogenicity and tumor clearance. A number of commercially available drugs and experimental vaccine adjuvants have been shown to target Tregs. Infants have high numbers of Tregs and often have poor responses to vaccination, yet the role Tregs play in controlling vaccine immunogenicity has not been explored in this age group. Herein, we explore the role of CD4(+)FOXP3(+)CD127(-) Tregs in controlling immunity in infant males and females to vaccination with diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis (DTP) and/or measles vaccine (MV). We find correlative evidence that circulating Tregs at the time of vaccination suppress antibody responses to MV but not DTP; and Tregs 4 weeks after DTP vaccination may suppress vaccine-specific cellular immunity. This opens the exciting possibility that Tregs may provide a future target for improved vaccine responses in early life, including reducing the number of doses of vaccine required. Such an approach would need to be safe and the benefits outweigh the risks, thus further research in this area is required.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
PubMed ID: 28855899
Web of Science ID: 407514400001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4296368

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
3Downloads
18Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item