[Accepted Manuscript] Trajectories of Alcohol Use Disorders and Their Differential Impact: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Goa, India.


Nadkarni, A.; Weiss, H.A.; Bhat, B.; Patel, V.; (2017) [Accepted Manuscript] Trajectories of Alcohol Use Disorders and Their Differential Impact: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Goa, India. Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire). ISSN 0735-0414 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/agx038

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine trajectories of Alcohol Use Disorders (AUD) over a 6 year period and compare the bio-psycho-social correlates between these trajectories. Community-based cohort of 1899 adult men were interviewed in 2006-2008 and 2012-2014. AUD were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test, and potential correlates including psycho-social problems, morbidity and physiological parameters were measured at follow-up. Logistic regression was conducted to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for the association of persistent and incident AUD, respectively, with the potential correlates. Analyses were weighted to account for sampling design, number of adults aged 18-49 years in the household and non-response. Compared with men who had recovered from AUD, there was strong evidence (P < 0.001) that men with persistent AUD were more likely to have marital problems, tobacco use, and raised Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) and strong evidence (0.001 < P < 0.01) that they were more likely to have workplace problems, social problems, increased healthcare contact and raised Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV). Compared with men who did not have AUD at baseline and follow-up, there was strong evidence (P < 0.001) that men with incident AUD were more likely to have workplace problems, social problems, marital problems, tobacco use, and raised GGT and strong evidence (0.001 < P < 0.01) that they were more likely to have hypertension, accident and injuries and Common Mental Disorders (CMD). This community-based longitudinal study of AUD, the first from a low and middle income country, clearly demonstrates significant health and social consequences of AUD in men and highlights the need for interventions for their treatment and prevention. Compared to persistent AUD, recovery from AUD has several benefits in health and social domains. Compared to developing new AUD, not having AUD has several benefits in health and social domains. Sustaining the state of not having AUD or recovery can lead to accumulation of health and social capital over time.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4258843

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