Yield of HIV-associated tuberculosis during intensified case finding in resource-limited settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis.


Kranzer, K; Houben, RM; Glynn, JR; Bekker, LG; Wood, R; Lawn, SD; (2010) Yield of HIV-associated tuberculosis during intensified case finding in resource-limited settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The Lancet infectious diseases, 10 (2). pp. 93-102. ISSN 1473-3099 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(09)70326-3

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Abstract

Intensified case finding is the regular screening for evidence of tuberculosis in people infected with HIV, at high risk of HIV, or living in congregate settings. We systematically reviewed studies of intensified case finding published between January, 1994, and April, 2009. In 78 eligible studies, the number of people with tuberculosis detected during intensified case finding varied substantially between countries and target groups of patients. Median prevalence of newly diagnosed tuberculosis was 0.7% in population-based surveys, 2.2% in contact-tracing studies, 2.3% in mines, 2.3% in programmes preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV, 2.5% in prisons, 8.2% in medical and antiretroviral treatment clinics, and 8.5% in voluntary counselling and testing services. Metaregression analysis of studies that included only people with HIV showed that for each increment in national prevalence of tuberculosis of 100 cases per 100 000 population, intensified case finding identified an additional one case per 100 screened individuals (p=0.03). Microbiological sputum examination of all individuals without prior selection by symptom screening yielded an additional four cases per 100 individuals screened (p=0.05). Data on the use of serial screening, treatment outcomes in actively identified cases of tuberculosis, and cost-effectiveness, however, were lacking. Concerted action is needed to develop intensified case finding as an important method for control of tuberculosis.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: TB Centre
PubMed ID: 20113978
Web of Science ID: 274721600015
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4188

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