Amodiaquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and combination therapy for uncomplicated falciparum malaria: a randomized controlled trial from Burkina Faso.


Zongo, I; Dorsey, G; Rouamba, N; Dokomajilar, C; Lankoande, M; Ouedraogo, JB; Rosenthal, PJ; (2005) Amodiaquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and combination therapy for uncomplicated falciparum malaria: a randomized controlled trial from Burkina Faso. The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene, 73 (5). pp. 826-32. ISSN 0002-9637

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Abstract

: Increasing resistance to chloroquine necessitates the evaluation of other antimalarial therapies in Africa. We compared the efficacies of amodiaquine (AQ), sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), and AQ + SP for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in a randomized trial of patients 6 months of age or older in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. Of the 944 patients enrolled, 829 (88%; 53% under 5 years of age) were assigned 28-day efficacy outcomes. For all regimens, early treatment failures were uncommon (< 2%). Considering all treatment failures based on WHO criteria, AQ + SP was most efficacious (failures in 4.2%), followed by SP (9.1%) and AQ (17.9%; P < 0.02 for all pairwise comparisons). Considering only clinical failures, relative efficacies were similar (failures in 2.1% with AQ + SP, 6.5% with SP, and 13.2% with AQ; P < 0.02 for all pairwise comparisons). The risk of recrudescence was lower with AQ + SP (2.1%) compared with SP (6.1%, P = 0.02) and AQ (8.1%, P = 0.001). Risks of new infection were lower with AQ + SP (2.1%) and SP (2.4%) compared with AQ (9.1%, P < 0.001 for both comparisons). No serious adverse events were seen. AQ + SP appears to offer a highly effective, inexpensive, and available therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Burkina Faso.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 16282288
Web of Science ID: 233404700003
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4172

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