Multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy in low-income countries: A meta-analysis of effects on stillbirths and on early and late neonatal mortality


Ronsmans, C; Fisher, DJ; Osmond, C; Margetts, BM; Fall, CHD; , Mmssg; (2009) Multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy in low-income countries: A meta-analysis of effects on stillbirths and on early and late neonatal mortality. Food and nutrition bulletin, 30 (4). S547-S555. ISSN 0379-5721

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Abstract

Background. Multiple micronutrient deficiencies are common among women in low-income countries and may adversely affect pregnancy outcomes Objective. To conduct a meta-analysis of the effects on stillbirths and on early and late neonatal mortality Of supplementation during pregnancy with multiple micronutrients compared with iron-folic acid in recent randomized, controlled trials. Methods. Twelve randomized, controlled trials were included in the analysis (Bangladesh; Burkina Faso; China; Guinea-Bissau; Indramayu and Lombok, Indonesia, Mexico; Sarlahi and Janakur, Nepal, Niger; Pakistan; and Zimbabwe), all providing approximately I recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of multiple micronutrients or iron-folic acid to presumed HIV-negative women. Results. Supplementation providing approximately I RDA of multiple micronutrients did not decrease the risk of stillbirth (OR = 1.01; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.16), early neonatal mortality (OR = 1.23; 9596 CI, 0.95 to 1.59), late neonatal mortality (OR 0 94; 95% CI, 0.73 to 1.23), or perinatal mortality (OR 1.1; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.33). Conclusions. Our meta-analysis provides consistent evidence that supplementation providing approximately 1 RDA of multiple micronutrients during pregnancy does not result in any reduction in stillbirths or in early or late neonatal deaths compared with iron-folic acid alone.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: randomized controlled-trial, double-blind, birth-weight, perinatal-mortality, gestational length, fetal loss, nepal, size, interventions, community
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
Maternal Health Group
Web of Science ID: 273596500009
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4143

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