Enhancement of cytokine-driven NK cell IFN-γ production after vaccination of HCMV infected Africans.


Darboe, A; Danso, E; Clarke, E; Umesi, A; Touray, E; Wegmuller, R; Moore, SE; Riley, EM; Goodier, MR; (2017) Enhancement of cytokine-driven NK cell IFN-γ production after vaccination of HCMV infected Africans. European journal of immunology, 47 (6). pp. 1040-1050. ISSN 0014-2980 DOI: 10.1002/eji.201746974

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Abstract

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection drives the phenotypic and functional differentiation of NK cells, thereby influencing the responses of these cells after vaccination. NK cell functional differentiation is particularly advanced in African populations with universal exposure to HCMV. To investigate the impact of advanced differentiation on vaccine-induced responses, we studied NK-cell function before and after vaccination with Trivalent Influenza Vaccine (TIV) or diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, inactivated poliovirus vaccine (DTPiP) in Africans with universal, lifelong HCMV exposure. In contrast to populations with lower prevalence of HCMV infection, no significant enhancement of NK-cell responses (IFN-γ, CD107a, CD25) occurred after in vitro re-stimulation of post-vaccination NK cells with TIV or DTPiP antigens compared to pre-vaccination baseline cells. However, both vaccinations resulted in higher frequencies of NK cells producing IFN-γ in response to exogenous IL-12 with IL-18, which persisted for up to 6 months. Enhanced cytokine responsiveness was restricted to less differentiated NK cells, with increased frequencies of IFN-γ(+) cells observed within CD56(bright) CD57(-) , CD56(dim) CD57(-) NKG2C(-) and CD56(dim) CD57(-) NKG2C(+) NK-cell subsets. These data suggest a common mechanism whereby different vaccines enhance NK cell IFN-γ function in HCMV infected donors and raise the potential for further exploitation of NK cell "pre-activation" to improve vaccine effectiveness.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Immunology and Infection
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
PubMed ID: 28383105
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4056046

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