The case for expanding the definition of 'key populations' to include high-risk groups in the general population to improve targeted HIV prevention efforts.


Shisana, O; Zungu, N; Evans, M; Risher, K; Rehle, T; Clementano, D; (2015) The case for expanding the definition of 'key populations' to include high-risk groups in the general population to improve targeted HIV prevention efforts. South African Medical Journal, 105 (8). pp. 664-9. ISSN 0256-9574 DOI: https://doi.org/10.7196/SAMJnew.7918

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Abstract

Two additional key populations within the general population in South Africa (SA) that are at risk of HIV infection are black African women aged 20 - 34 years and black African men aged 25 - 49 years. To investigate the social determinants of HIV serostatus for these two high-risk populations. Data from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence, and Behaviour Survey were analysed for black African women aged 20 - 34 years and black African men aged 25 - 49 years. Of the 6.4 million people living with HIV in SA in 2012, 1.8 million (28%) were black women aged 20 - 34 years and 1.9 million (30%) black men aged 25 - 49 years. In 2012, they constituted 58% of the total HIV-positive population and 48% of the newly infected population. Low socioeconomic status (SES) was strongly associated (p<0.001) with being HIV-positive among black women aged 20 - 34 years, and was marginally significant among black men aged 25 - 49 years (p<0.1). Low SES is a critical social determinant for HIV infection among the high-risk groups of black African women aged 20 - 34 years and black African men aged 25 - 49 years. Targeted interventions for these key populations should prioritise socioeconomic empowerment, access to formal housing and services, access to higher education, and broad economic transformation.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
PubMed ID: 26449696
Web of Science ID: 360953600019
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4052670

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