Campylobacter bacteremia in London: A 44-year single-center study.


O'Hara, GA; Fitchett, JRA; Klein, JL; (2017) Campylobacter bacteremia in London: A 44-year single-center study. Diagnostic microbiology and infectious disease. ISSN 0732-8893 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2017.05.015

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Abstract

Campylobacter species are a well-recognized but rare cause of bloodstream infection. Here we reviewed 41 cases of Campylobacter bloodstream infection occurring at a single center in London over 44years, comprising 0.2% of all recorded episodes during this time period. Patients had a mean age of 46years and, contrasting with previous reports, nearly 50% of our patients did not have significant comorbidities. Ciprofloxacin resistance increased over the study period with 35% of isolates overall being resistant compared with only 3% exhibiting macrolide resistance. Despite a minority of patients receiving appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, overall mortality was only 7%. Campylobacter bacteremia remains a rare but significant cause of morbidity with a low associated mortality. Underlying immunosuppressive conditions are common but by no means universal. In our setting, macrolides would be favored as empirical agents to treat suspected Campylobacter enteritis, including cases with associated bacteremia.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
PubMed ID: 28629878
Web of Science ID: 408181600014
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/3984154

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