Validity and reproducibility of a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire for use among Portuguese pregnant women


Pinto, E; Severo, M; Correia, S; Silva, ID; Lopes, C; Barros, H; (2010) Validity and reproducibility of a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire for use among Portuguese pregnant women. Maternal & child nutrition, 6 (2). pp. 105-119. ISSN 1740-8695 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1740-8709.2009.00199.x

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Abstract

This study aimed to evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to estimate nutrient intake among Portuguese pregnant women. A sample of 101 pregnant women completed a 3-day food diary (FD) in each pregnancy trimester (reference method) and an interviewer-administered FFQ in the immediate post-partum period. Ranking women according to their usual intake showed that, on average, 65% were classified into the same +/- 1 quintile and 2.4% into opposite quintiles by the two methods. Energy-adjusted and de-attenuated correlation coefficients ranged from 0.20 (protein) to 0.58 (riboflavin). Similar results were obtained when the FFQ was compared to each trimester-specific FD. To assess the FFQ reproducibility, 70 women in their third pregnancy trimester were interviewed twice within a 2-week interval. The level of agreement was high, with >= 75% of the participants being classified into the same +/- 1 quintile by the two administrations for 13 of the 15 nutrients examined. A review of the published literature revealed that this is the first FFQ to take the whole pregnancy as its reference time window. Our findings showed that a single administration of this FFQ in the immediate post-partum period is a valid tool to rank Portuguese pregnant women according to their intakes.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: birth cohort, diet, dietary assessment tools, food frequency, questionnaire, nutrition, pregnancy, neural-tube defects, low-birth-weight, dietary-intake, fatty-acids, validation, nutrition, outcomes, size, reliability, consumption
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
Web of Science ID: 275531800001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/3926

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