Survival from twenty adult cancers in the UK and Republic of Ireland in the late twentieth century.


Woods, LM; Rachet, B; Shack, L; Catney, D; Walsh, PM; Cooper, N; White, C; Mak, V; Steward, J; Comber, H; Gavin, A; Brewster, D; Quinn, M; Coleman, MP; (2010) Survival from twenty adult cancers in the UK and Republic of Ireland in the late twentieth century. Health statistics quarterly / Office for National Statistics, 46 (1). pp. 7-26. ISSN 1465-1645 DOI: 10.1057/hsq.2010.9

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Abstract

BackgroundInternational studies have shown that cancer survival was generally low in the UK and the Republic of Ireland compared to western and northern European countries, but no systematic comparative analysis has been performed between the UK countries and the Republic of Ireland.MethodsPopulation-based survival for 20 adult malignancies was estimated for the UK and the Republic of Ireland. Data on adults (15-99 years) diagnosed between 1991 and 1999 in England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland (1993-99) and the Republic of Ireland (1994-99) were analysed. All cases were followed up until the end of 2001. Relative survival was estimated by sex, period of diagnosis and country, and for the nine regions of England. Predicted survival was estimated using the hybrid approach.ResultsOverall, cancer survival in UK and Republic of Ireland improved during the 1990s, but there was geographic variation in survival across the UK and Republic of Ireland. Survival was generally highest in Ireland and Northern Ireland and lowest in England and Wales. Survival tended to be higher in Scotland for cancers for which early detection methods were in place. In England, survival tended to be lower in the north and higher in the south.ConclusionsThe geographic variations in survival seen across the UK and Republic of Ireland are narrower than between these countries and comparable European countries. Artefact is likely to explain some, but not all of the differences across the UK and Republic of Ireland. Geographic differences in stage at diagnosis, co-morbidity and other clinical factors may also be relevant.List of Tables, 9.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Cancer Survival Group
Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 20531364
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/3492

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