Measuring high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T blood concentration in population surveys.


Lazzarino, AI; Mindell, JS; (2017) Measuring high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T blood concentration in population surveys. PLoS One, 12 (1). e0171242. ISSN 1932-6203 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0171242

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Abstract

: The blood test for high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (HS-CTnT) has been proposed as a marker of cardiovascular risk in the general population, as it is associated with subsequent incidence of cardiovascular events and mortality. We aimed at evaluating the feasibility of HS-CTnT testing within large nationally-representative population surveys in which blood samples are collected during household visits, shipped using the standard civil postal service, and then frozen for subsequent analyses.<br/> : The Health Survey for England (HSE) consists of a series of annual surveys beginning in 1991. It is designed to provide regular information on various aspects of the nation's health and risk factors. We measured HS-CTnT in the blood of 200 people from the HSE 2016 wave, then froze and stored their blood samples at -40°C for 5-10 weeks, and then thawed and retested them to appreciate the extent of within-person agreement or test-retest reliability of the two measurements.<br/> : The Cronbach's Alpha (Scale Reliability Coefficient) and the Interclass Correlation Coefficient (two-way mixed-effects model for consistency of agreement at individual level) were 0.97 (95%CI = 0.96-0.99) and 0.95 (95%CI = 0.94-0.96) respectively. The time delay from blood withdrawal to analysis and storage (1-4 days) did not affect the results, nor did the freezing time before the retest (5-10 weeks).<br/> : The measurement of HS-CTnT plasma concentration within large nationally-representative surveys such as the Health Survey for England is feasible.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
PubMed ID: 28141863
Web of Science ID: 396129500052
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/3429872

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