The N-linking glycosylation system from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is required for adhesion and has potential use in glycoengineering.


Cuccui, J; Terra, VS; Bossé, JT; Naegeli, A; Abouelhadid, S; Li, Y; Lin, CW; Vohra, P; Tucker, AW; Rycroft, AN; Maskell, DJ; Aebi, M; Langford, PR; Wren, BW; BRaDP1T Consortium, ; (2016) The N-linking glycosylation system from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is required for adhesion and has potential use in glycoengineering. Open biology, 7 (1). ISSN 2046-2441 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1098/rsob.160212

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
License:

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a mucosal respiratory pathogen causing contagious porcine pleuropneumonia. Pathogenesis studies have demonstrated a major role for the capsule, exotoxins and outer membrane proteins. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae can also glycosylate proteins, using a cytoplasmic N-linked glycosylating enzyme designated NGT, but its transcriptional arrangement and role in virulence remains unknown. We investigated the NGT locus and demonstrated that the putative transcriptional unit consists of rimO, ngt and a glycosyltransferase termed agt. From this information we used the A. pleuropneumoniae glycosylation locus to decorate an acceptor protein, within Escherichia coli, with a hexose polymer that reacted with an anti-dextran antibody. Mass spectrometry analysis of a truncated protein revealed that this operon could add up to 29 repeat units to the appropriate sequon. We demonstrated the importance of NGT in virulence, by creating deletion mutants and testing them in a novel respiratory cell line adhesion model. This study demonstrates the importance of the NGT glycosylation system for pathogenesis and its potential biotechnological application for glycoengineering.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Pathogen Molecular Biology
PubMed ID: 28077594
Web of Science ID: 393382200002
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/3340146

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
62Downloads
81Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item