ANALYSIS OF AN HIV/AIDS MODEL WITH PUBLIC-HEALTH INFORMATION CAMPAIGNS AND INDIVIDUAL WITHDRAWAL


Nyabadza, F; Chiyaka, C; Mukandavire, Z; Hove-Musekwa, SD; (2010) ANALYSIS OF AN HIV/AIDS MODEL WITH PUBLIC-HEALTH INFORMATION CAMPAIGNS AND INDIVIDUAL WITHDRAWAL. Journal of biological systems, 18 (2). pp. 357-375. ISSN 0218-3390

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Primary prevention measures designed to alter susceptibility and/or reduce exposure of susceptible individuals to diseases, remain the mainstay in the fight against HIV/AIDS. A model for HIV/AIDS, that investigates the reduction in infection by advocating for sexual behavior change through public-health information campaigns and withdrawal of individuals with AIDS from sexual activity is proposed and analyzed. The contact rate is modeled using an incidence function with saturation that depends on the number of infectives. The dynamics of the model is determined using the model reproduction number R(0). Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the role of some key epidemiological parameters. The results from the study demonstrate that an increase in the rate of dissemination of effective public-health information campaigns results in a decrease in the prevalence of the disease. Similarly, an increase in the fraction of individuals with AIDS who withdraw from sexual activities reduces the burden of the disease.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Information Campaigns, HIV/AIDS, Stability, Reproduction Number, Contact, Rate, nonlinear incidence rate, epidemic model, hiv-infection, disease, prevention, stability, behavior, uganda, impact, will
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
Research Centre: Social and Mathematical Epidemiology (SaME)
SaME Modelling & Economics
Web of Science ID: 278953000006
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/333665

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
318Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item