E-cigarettes and equity: a systematic review of differences in awareness and use between sociodemographic groups.


Hartwell, G; Thomas, S; Egan, M; Gilmore, A; Petticrew, M; (2016) E-cigarettes and equity: a systematic review of differences in awareness and use between sociodemographic groups. Tobacco control. ISSN 0964-4563 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2016-053222

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Abstract

: To assess whether electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) awareness, 'ever use' and current use vary significantly between different sociodemographic groups.<br/> : Systematic review.<br/> : Published and unpublished reports identified by searching seven electronic databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE, Global Health, PsycINFO, CINAHL Plus) and grey literature sources.<br/> : Systematic search for and appraisal of cross-sectional or longitudinal studies that assessed e-cigarette awareness, 'ever use' or current use, and included subgroup analysis of 1 or more PROGRESS Plus sociodemographic groups. No geographical or time restrictions imposed. Assessment by multiple reviewers, with 17% of full articles screened meeting the selection criteria.<br/> : Data extracted and checked by multiple reviewers, with quality assessed using an adapted tool developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute.<br/> : Results of narrative synthesis suggest broadly that awareness, 'ever use' and current use of e-cigarettes may be particularly prevalent among older adolescents and younger adults, males, people of white ethnicity and-particularly in the case of awareness and 'ever use'-those of intermediate or high levels of education. In some cases, results also varied within and between countries.<br/> : E-cigarette awareness, 'ever use' and current use appear to be patterned by a number of sociodemographic factors which vary between different countries and subnational localities. Care will therefore be required to ensure neither the potential benefits nor the potential risks of e-cigarettes exacerbate existing health inequalities.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
PubMed ID: 28003324
Web of Science ID: 419461800002
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/3298917

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