Activity compensation and activity synergy in British 8-13year olds.


Goodman, A; Mackett, RL; Paskins, J; (2011) Activity compensation and activity synergy in British 8-13year olds. Preventive medicine. ISSN 0091-7435 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.07.019

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To examine whether children compensate for participating in physically active behaviors by reducing activity at other times (the 'activitystat' hypothesis); or alternatively become more active at other times (activity synergy). METHODS: In 2002-2006, 345 British children (8-13years) completed activity diaries and wore accelerometers. This generated 1077days of data which we analyzed between-children (comparing all days) and within-child (comparing days from the same child). RESULTS: On week and weekend days, each extra 1% of time in PE/games, school breaks, school active travel, non-school active travel, structured sports and out-of-home play predicted a 0.21 to 0.60% increase in the proportion of the day in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). None of these behaviors showed evidence of partial compensation at other times (all p>0.15). Moreover, each 1% increase in weekday non-school active travel predicted 0.38% more time in MVPA at other times (95% CI 0.18, 0.58). This activity synergy reflected children using active travel for playing and visiting friends. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to the 'activitystat' hypothesis, we found no evidence of activity compensation. This suggests that interventions increasing activity in specific behaviors may increase activity overall. The activity synergy of non-school active travel underlines the need for further research into this neglected behavior.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Research Centre: Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
Transport & Health Group
PubMed ID: 21820009
Web of Science ID: 296935200022
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/317

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