Pyriproxyfen and the microcephaly epidemic in Brazil - an ecological approach to explore the hypothesis of their association.


Albuquerque, MF; Souza, WV; Mendes, AD; Lyra, TM; Ximenes, RA; Araújo, TV; Braga, C; Miranda-Filho, DB; Martelli, CM; Rodrigues, LC; (2016) Pyriproxyfen and the microcephaly epidemic in Brazil - an ecological approach to explore the hypothesis of their association. Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. ISSN 0074-0276 DOI: 10.1590/0074-02760160291

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Abstract

The microcephaly epidemic in Brazil generated intense debate regarding its causality, and one hypothesised cause of this epidemic, now recognised as congenital Zika virus syndrome, was the treatment of drinking water tanks with pyriproxyfen to control Aedes aegypti larvae. We present the results of a geographical analysis of the association between the prevalence of microcephaly confirmed by Fenton growth charts and the type of larvicide used in the municipalities that were home to the mothers of the affected newborns in the metropolitan region of Recife in Pernambuco, the state in Brazil where the epidemic was first detected. The overall prevalence of microcephaly was 82 per 10,000 live births in the three municipalities that used the larvicide Bti (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis) instead of pyriproxyfen, and 69 per 10,000 live births in the eleven municipalities that used pyriproxyfen. The difference was not statistically significant. Our results show that the prevalence of microcephaly was not higher in the areas in which pyriproxyfen was used. In this ecological approach, there was no evidence of a correlation between the use of pyriproxyfen in the municipalities and the microcephaly epidemic.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Centre for Statistical Methodology
PubMed ID: 27812601
Web of Science ID: 391437500009
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/3061461

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