A history of Doughty's Hospital Norwich, 1687-2009 Guillain-Barre Syndrome, Influenzalike Illnesses, and Influenza Vaccination During Seasons With and Without Circulating A/H1N1 Viruses


Gorsky, M; Grimaldi-Bensouda, L; Alperovitch, A; Besson, G; Vial, C; Cuisset, JM; Papeix, C; Lyon-Caen, O; Benichou, J; Rossignol, M; Abenhaim, L; Grp, GB-, PS; (2011) A history of Doughty's Hospital Norwich, 1687-2009 Guillain-Barre Syndrome, Influenzalike Illnesses, and Influenza Vaccination During Seasons With and Without Circulating A/H1N1 Viruses. Econ Hist Rev, 64 (3). pp. 1032-1033. ISSN 0013-0117 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0289.2010.00597_7.x 10.1093/aje/kwr072

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Abstract

The role of influenzalike illnesses and influenza vaccination in the development of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), particularly the role of A/H1N1 epidemics and A/H1N1 vaccination, is debated. Data on all incident GBS cases meeting the Brighton Collaboration criteria that were diagnosed at 25 neurology centers in France were prospectively collected between March 2007 and June 2010, covering 3 influenzavirus seasons, including the 2009-2010 A/H1N1 outbreak. A total of 457 general practitioners provided a registry of patients from which 1,080 controls were matched by age, gender, index date (calendar month), and region to 145 cases. Causal relations were assessed by multivariate case-control analysis with adjustment for risk factors (personal and family history of autoimmune disorders, among others), while matching on age, gender, and calendar time. Influenza (seasonal or A/H1N1) or influenzalike symptoms in the 2 months preceding the index date was associated with GBS, with a matched odds ratio of 2.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7, 8.2). The difference in the rates of GBS occurring between influenza virus circulation periods and noncirculation periods was highly statistically significant (P = 0.004). Adjusted odds ratios for GBS occurrence within 6 weeks after seasonal and A/H1N1 vaccination were 1.3 (95% CI: 0.4, 4.1) and 0.9 (95% CI: 0.1, 7.6), respectively. Study results confirm that influenza virus is a likely risk factor for GBS. Conversely, no new concerns have arisen regarding influenza vaccination.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/295

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