Direct whole-genome deep-sequencing of human respiratory syncytial virus A and B from Vietnamese children identifies distinct patterns of inter- and intra-host evolution.


Do, LA; Wilm, A; Van Doorn, HR; Lam, HM; Sim, S; Sukumaran, R; Tran, AT; Nguyen, BH; Tran, TT; Tran, QH; Vo, QB; Dac, NA; Trinh, HN; Nguyen, TT; Binh, BT; Le, K; Nguyen, MT; Thai, QT; Vo, TV; Ngo, NQ; Dang, TK; Cao, NH; Tran, TV; Ho, LV; Farrar, J; Jong, Md; Chen, S; Nagarajan, N; Bryant, JE; Hibberd, ML; (2015) Direct whole-genome deep-sequencing of human respiratory syncytial virus A and B from Vietnamese children identifies distinct patterns of inter- and intra-host evolution. The Journal of general virology, 96 (12). pp. 3470-83. ISSN 0022-1317 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1099/jgv.0.000298

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Abstract

Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children ,2 years of age. Little is known about RSV intra-host genetic diversity over the course of infection or about the immune pressures that drive RSV molecular evolution. We performed whole-genome deep-sequencing on 53 RSV-positive samples (37 RSV subgroup A and 16 RSV subgroup B) collected from the upper airways of hospitalized children in southern Vietnam over two consecutive seasons. RSV A NA1 and RSV B BA9 were the predominant genotypes found in our samples, consistent with other reports on global RSV circulation during the same period. For both RSV A and B, the M gene was the most conserved, confirming its potential as a target for novel therapeutics. The G gene was the most variable and was the only gene under detectable positive selection. Further, positively selected sites inG were found in close proximity to and in some cases overlapped with predicted glycosylation motifs, suggesting that selection on amino acid glycosylation may drive viral genetic diversity. We further identified hotspots and coldspots of intra-host genetic diversity in the RSV genome, some of which may highlight previously unknown regions of functional importance.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Pathogen Molecular Biology
PubMed ID: 26407694
Web of Science ID: 369521800003
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2869466

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