Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli isolates from pediatric population in Pakistan.


Khalil, U; Younus, M; Asghar, N; Siddiqui, F; Gómez-Duarte, OG; Wren, BW; Bokhari, H; (2016) Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli isolates from pediatric population in Pakistan. APMIS, 124 (10). pp. 872-80. ISSN 0903-4641 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/apm.12577

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Abstract

: Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are a leading cause of diarrhea among children. The objective of this study was to define the frequency of EAEC among diarrheal children from flood-affected areas as well as sporadic cases, determine multidrug resistance, and evaluation of virulence using an in vivo model of pathogenesis. Stool samples were collected from 225 diarrheal children from 2010 to 2011 from flood-affected areas as well as from sporadic cases in Pakistan. Identified EAEC isolates were characterized by phylogrouping, antibiotic resistance patterns including the extended-spectrum beta lactamase spectrum, single nucleotide polymorphism detection in gyrA and parC, and virulence potential using wax worm, G. mellonella. A total of 35 (12.5%) confirmed EAEC isolates were identified among 225 E. coli isolates. EAEC isolates displayed high resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, and cefaclor. A total of 34.28% were ESBL positive. Single nucleotide polymorphism detection revealed 37.14% and 68.57% isolates were positive for SNPs in gyrA (A660 -T660 ) and parC (C330 -T330 ), respectively. Phylogrouping revealed that B2 phylogroup was more prevalent among all EAEC isolates tested followed by D, A, B1, and non-typeable (NT). Infection of G. mellonella with EAEC showed that killing infective dose was 100% higher than E. coli DH5 alpha control. EAEC are prevalent among Pakistani children with diarrhea, they are highly resistant to antibiotics, and predominantly fall into B2 phylogroup. Epidemiologic surveillance of EAEC and other E. coli pathotypes is critical to assess not only the role of these pathogens in diarrheal disease but also to determine the extent of multidrug resistance among the population.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Pathogen Molecular Biology
PubMed ID: 27485156
Web of Science ID: 384832800007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2698056

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