Pneumococcal Nasopharyngeal Carriage Following Reduced Doses of 7-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and a 23-valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Booster.


Russell, FM; Carapetis, JR; Satzke, C; Tikoduadua, L; Waqatakirewa, L; Chandra, R; Seduadua, A; Oftadeh, S; Cheung, YB; Gilbert, GL; Mulholland, EK; (2010) Pneumococcal Nasopharyngeal Carriage Following Reduced Doses of 7-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and a 23-valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Booster. Clinical and vaccine immunology . ISSN 1556-6811 DOI: 10.1128/CVI.00117-10

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Abstract

Background: To evaluate the effect of a reduced dose 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) primary series followed by a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (23vPPS) booster on nasopharyngeal (NP) pneumococcal carriage. Methods: Fijian infants aged 6 weeks were randomized to receive 0, 1, 2, or 3 PCV doses. Within each group, half received 23vPPS at 12 months. NP swabs were taken at 6, 9, 12, and 17 months and cultured for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Isolates were serotyped by multiplex-PCR and reverse-line blot assay. Results: For PCV vaccine type (VT) carriage, there were no significant differences in carriage between the 3 and 2 dose groups at 12 months. VT NP carriage was significantly higher (p<0.01) in the unvaccinated group compared to the 3 dose group at 9 months of age. There appeared to be a PCV dose effect in the cumulative proportion of infants carrying VTs with less VT carriage occurring with more doses of PCV. Non-PCV serotype (NVT) carriage rates were similar for all PCV groups. When groups were pooled by receipt or no receipt of the 12 month 23vPPS, there were no differences in pneumococcal, VT, or NVT carriage rates between the 2 groups at 17 months of age. Conclusions: There appeared to be a PCV dose effect on VT carriage with less VT carriage occurring with more doses of PCV. By 17 months of age NVT carriage rates were similar for all groups. 23vPPS had no impact on carriage, despite the substantial boosts in antibody levels.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Vaccine Centre
PubMed ID: 20943882
Web of Science ID: 284686400021
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2556

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