Crowdsourcing HIV Test Promotion Videos: A Noninferiority Randomized Controlled Trial in China.


Tang, W; Han, L; Best, J; Zhang, Y; Mollan, K; Kim, J; Liu, F; Hudgens, M; Bayus, B; Terris-Prestholt, F; Galler, S; Yang, L; Peeling, R; Volberding, P; Ma, B; Xu, H; Yang, B; Huang, S; Fenton, K; Wei, C; Tucker, JD; (2016) Crowdsourcing HIV Test Promotion Videos: A Noninferiority Randomized Controlled Trial in China. Clinical infectious diseases , 62 (11). pp. 1436-42. ISSN 1058-4838 DOI: 10.1093/cid/ciw171

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Crowdsourcing, the process of shifting individual tasks to a large group, may enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing interventions. We conducted a noninferiority, randomized controlled trial to compare first-time HIV testing rates among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender individuals who received a crowdsourced or a health marketing HIV test promotion video.<br/> METHODS: Seven hundred twenty-one MSM and transgender participants (≥16 years old, never before tested for HIV) were recruited through 3 Chinese MSM Web portals and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 videos. The crowdsourced video was developed using an open contest and formal transparent judging while the evidence-based health marketing video was designed by experts. Study objectives were to measure HIV test uptake within 3 weeks of watching either HIV test promotion video and cost per new HIV test and diagnosis.<br/> RESULTS: Overall, 624 of 721 (87%) participants from 31 provinces in 217 Chinese cities completed the study. HIV test uptake was similar between the crowdsourced arm (37% [114/307]) and the health marketing arm (35% [111/317]). The estimated difference between the interventions was 2.1% (95% confidence interval, -5.4% to 9.7%). Among those tested, 31% (69/225) reported a new HIV diagnosis. The crowdsourced intervention cost substantially less than the health marketing intervention per first-time HIV test (US$131 vs US$238 per person) and per new HIV diagnosis (US$415 vs US$799 per person).<br/> CONCLUSIONS: Our nationwide study demonstrates that crowdsourcing may be an effective tool for improving HIV testing messaging campaigns and could increase community engagement in health campaigns.<br/> CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NCT02248558.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: Social and Mathematical Epidemiology (SaME)
SaME Modelling & Economics
PubMed ID: 27129465
Web of Science ID: 378433400022
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2548532

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