The role familiarity with science and medicine plays in parents' decision making about enrolling a child in vaccine research.


Chantler, TE; Lees, A; Moxon, ER; Mant, D; Pollard, AJ; Fiztpatrick, R; (2007) The role familiarity with science and medicine plays in parents' decision making about enrolling a child in vaccine research. Qualitative health research, 17 (3). pp. 311-22. ISSN 1049-7323 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732306298561

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Abstract

Parental consent to children's participation in vaccine research has resulted in the licensure of essential vaccines. Recruitment to this type of research is typically difficult, however, and many parents decline. In this study, the authors interviewed parents about their decision for or against enrolling their child in a vaccine study. The data analysis suggests that parents' ability to evaluate a vaccine study depends on how attuned they are with science and medicine, either professionally or as consumers of health services. Familiarity does not predispose parents to enrolling their child in research; rather, it is a predictor of parents' confidence in their decision making. Many parents were motivated by altruism and trust, which, if uninformed, can leave the parents prone to exploitation. It is vital to ensure that parents are confident in their judgment of a study and its potential benefit to their child and society.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
PubMed ID: 17301340
Web of Science ID: 244346200004
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2541852

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