Misperception of body weight among overweight or obese adults in Mauritius.


Caleyachetty, R; Kengne, AP; Muennig, P; Rutter, H; Echouffo-Tcheugui, JB; (2016) Misperception of body weight among overweight or obese adults in Mauritius. Obesity research & clinical practice, 10 (2). pp. 216-9. ISSN 1871-403X DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.orcp.2016.02.006

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Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: In the African region, little is known about weight misperception among overweight or obese adults. We assessed the prevalence of weight misperception and predictors of weight misperception among overweight or obese adults in Mauritius. Height, weight, and self-perception of weight status data from 5736 adults (≥19 years of age), sampled in a population-based survey in 2009 were analysed. Weight status was defined using BMI calculated on the basis of measured height and weight. Information regarding self-perceived body weight, socio-demographic and self-rated health data were collected using a questionnaire.<br/> RESULTS: Overall 41% of overweight or obese adults misclassified their own weight status. Among adults who were overweight or obese, weight misperception was increasingly less likely among those with increasing education (men: p=0.02; women: p≤0.001) but was more likely among those who perceived their overall health as good or excellent (men: PR=1.29, 95% CI 1.10-1.52; women: PR=1.42, 95% CI 1.26-1.60). Adults who were overweight or obese, weight misperception was increasingly less likely with increasing income (men: p=0.025; women: p≤0.001). Among women who were overweight or obese, weight misperception was increasingly more likely with increasing age (p≤0.001) and those who self-reported Chinese ethnicity (PR=1.48, 95% CI 1.22-1.78).<br/> CONCLUSION: A large proportion of adults in Mauritius misperceive their own weight status, with variation by socio-demographic characteristics and self-rated health. Future studies are needed to examine if correcting misperceptions of weight status may support obesity prevention and control efforts in Mauritius.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Health Services Research and Policy
Research Centre: ECOHOST - The Centre for Health and Social Change
Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 27079119
Web of Science ID: 375122900014
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2537419

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