The transfer and decay of maternal antibody against Shigella sonnei in a longitudinal cohort of Vietnamese infants.


Thompson, CN; Tu, LT; Anders, KL; Hieu, NT; Vi, LL; Chau, NV; Duong, VT; Chau, NN; Chau, TT; Tuyen, HT; Nga, TV; Van Minh, P; Nhu, TD; Nhi, LT; Saul, A; Martin, LB; Podda, A; Gerke, C; Thwaites, G; Simmons, CP; Baker, S; (2015) The transfer and decay of maternal antibody against Shigella sonnei in a longitudinal cohort of Vietnamese infants. Vaccine. ISSN 0264-410X DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.12.047

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Abstract

Shigella sonnei is an emergent and major diarrheal pathogen for which there is currently no vaccine. We aimed to quantify duration of maternal antibody against S. sonnei and investigate transplacental IgG transfer in a birth cohort in southern Vietnam. Over 500-paired maternal/infant plasma samples were evaluated for presence of anti-S. sonnei-O IgG and IgM. Longitudinal plasma samples allowed for the estimation of the median half-life of maternal anti-S. sonnei-O IgG, which was 43 days (95% confidence interval: 41-45 days). Additionally, half of infants lacked a detectable titer by 19 weeks of age. Lower cord titers were associated with greater increases in S. sonnei IgG over the first year of life, and the incidence of S. sonnei seroconversion was estimated to be 4/100 infant years. Maternal IgG titer, the ratio of antibody transfer, the season of birth and gestational age were significantly associated with cord titer. Maternal anti-S. sonnei-O IgG is efficiently transferred across the placenta and anti-S. sonnei-O maternal IgG declines rapidly after birth and is undetectable after 5 months in the majority of children. Preterm neonates and children born to mothers with low IgG titers have lower cord titers and therefore may be at greater risk of seroconversion in infancy.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Pathogen Molecular Biology
PubMed ID: 26742945
Web of Science ID: 370108500011
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2507992

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