Vitamin D-Fortified Milk Achieves the Targeted Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration without Affecting That of Parathyroid Hormone in New Zealand Toddlers.


Houghton, LA; Gray, AR; Szymlek-Gay, EA; Heath, AL; Ferguson, EL; (2011) Vitamin D-Fortified Milk Achieves the Targeted Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration without Affecting That of Parathyroid Hormone in New Zealand Toddlers. The Journal of nutrition. ISSN 0022-3166 DOI: https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.111.145052

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Abstract

For young children, the level of vitamin D required to ensure that most achieve targeted serum 25(OH)D ?50 nmol/L has not been studied. We aimed to investigate the effect of vitamin D-fortified milk on serum 25(OH)D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations and to examine the dose-response relationship between vitamin D intake from study milks and serum 25(OH)D concentrations in healthy toddlers aged 12-20 mo living in Dunedin, New Zealand (latitude 46°S). Data from a 20-wk, partially blinded, randomized trial that investigated the effect of providing red meat or fortified toddler milk on the iron, zinc, iodine, and vitamin D status in young New Zealand children (n = 181; mean age 17 mo) were used. Adherence to the intervention was assessed by 7-d weighed diaries at wk 2, 7, 11, 15, and 19. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was measured at baseline and wk 20. Mean vitamin D intake provided by fortified milk was 3.7 ?g/d (range, 0-10.4 ?g/d). After 20 wk, serum 25(OH)D concentrations but not PTH were significantly different in the milk groups. The prevalence of having a serum 25(OH)D <50 nmol/L remained relatively unchanged at 43% in the meat group, whereas it significantly decreased to between 11 and 15% in those consuming fortified study milk. In New Zealand, vitamin D intake in young children is minimal. Our findings indicate that habitual consumption of vitamin D-fortified milk providing a mean intake of nearly 4 ?g/d was effective in achieving adequate year-round serum 25(OH)D for most children.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Research Centre: Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
PubMed ID: 21832027
Web of Science ID: 295193000012
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/250

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