The age patterns of severe malaria syndromes in sub-Saharan Africa across a range of transmission intensities and seasonality settings.


Roca-Feltrer, A; Carneiro, I; Smith, L; Schellenberg, JR; Greenwood, B; Schellenberg, D; (2010) The age patterns of severe malaria syndromes in sub-Saharan Africa across a range of transmission intensities and seasonality settings. Malar J, 9. p. 282. ISSN 1475-2875 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-9-282

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Abstract

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A greater understanding of the relationship between transmission intensity, seasonality and the age-pattern of malaria is needed to guide appropriate targeting of malaria interventions in different epidemiological settings. METHODS: A systematic literature review identified studies which reported the age of paediatric hospital admissions with cerebral malaria (CM), severe malarial anaemia (SMA), or respiratory distress (RD). Study sites were categorized into a 3 × 2 matrix of Plasmodium falciparum transmission intensity and seasonality. Probability distributions were fitted by maximum likelihood methods, and best fitting models were used to estimate median ages and to represent graphically the age-pattern of each outcome for each transmission category in the matrix. RESULTS: A shift in the burden of CM towards younger age groups was seen with increasing intensity of transmission, but this was not the case for SMA or RD. Sites with 'no marked seasonality' showed more evidence of skewed age-patterns compared to areas of 'marked seasonality' for all three severe malaria syndromes. CONCLUSIONS: Although the peak age of CM will increase as transmission intensity decreases in Africa, more than 75% of all paediatric hospital admissions of severe malaria are likely to remain in under five year olds in most epidemiological settings.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Distance Learning
Academic Services & Administration > Distance Learning
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 20939931
Web of Science ID: 283485900001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2454

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