Ebola virus disease in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1976-2014.


Rosello, A; Mossoko, M; Flasche, S; Van Hoek, AJ; Mbala, P; Camacho, A; Funk, S; Kucharski, A; Ilunga, BK; Edmunds, WJ; Piot, P; Baguelin, M; Muyembe Tamfum, JJ; (2015) Ebola virus disease in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1976-2014. Elife, 4. ISSN 2050-084X DOI: 10.7554/eLife.09015

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Abstract

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has experienced the most outbreaks of Ebola virus disease since the virus' discovery in 1976. This article provides for the first time a description and a line list for all outbreaks in this country, comprising 996 cases. Compared to patients over 15 years old, the odds of dying were significantly lower in patients aged 5 to 15 and higher in children under five (with 100% mortality in those under 2 years old). The odds of dying increased by 11% per day that a patient was not hospitalised. Outbreaks with an initially high reproduction number, R (>3), were rapidly brought under control, whilst outbreaks with a lower initial R caused longer and generally larger outbreaks. These findings can inform the choice of target age groups for interventions and highlight the importance of both reducing the delay between symptom onset and hospitalisation and rapid national and international response.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Academic Services & Administration > Academic Administration
Research Centre: Centre for the Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases
PubMed ID: 26525597
Web of Science ID: 364815200001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2344681

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