Trachoma and Ocular Chlamydial Infection in the Era of Genomics.


Derrick, T; Roberts, CH; Last, AR; Burr, SE; Holland, MJ; (2015) Trachoma and Ocular Chlamydial Infection in the Era of Genomics. Mediators of inflammation, 2015. p. 791847. ISSN 0962-9351 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/791847

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Abstract

Trachoma is a blinding disease usually caused by infection with Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) serovars A, B, and C in the upper tarsal conjunctiva. Individuals in endemic regions are repeatedly infected with Ct throughout childhood. A proportion of individuals experience prolonged or severe inflammatory episodes that are known to be significant risk factors for ocular scarring in later life. Continued scarring often leads to trichiasis and in-turning of the eyelashes, which causes pain and can eventually cause blindness. The mechanisms driving the chronic immunopathology in the conjunctiva, which largely progresses in the absence of detectable Ct infection in adults, are likely to be multifactorial. Socioeconomic status, education, and behavior have been identified as contributing to the risk of scarring and inflammation. We focus on the contribution of host and pathogen genetic variation, bacterial ecology of the conjunctiva, and host epigenetic imprinting including small RNA regulation by both host and pathogen in the development of ocular pathology. Each of these factors or processes contributes to pathogenic outcomes in other inflammatory diseases and we outline their potential role in trachoma.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: Neglected Tropical Diseases Network
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PubMed ID: 26424969
Web of Science ID: 361214700001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2315534

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