Development and evaluation of an online tool for management of overweight children in primary care: a pilot study.


Park, MH; Skow, Á, ; Puradiredja, DI; Lucas, A; Syrad, H; Sovio, U; White, B; Kessel, AS; Taylor, B; Saxena, S; Viner, RM; Kinra, S; (2015) Development and evaluation of an online tool for management of overweight children in primary care: a pilot study. BMJ open, 5 (6). e007326. ISSN 2044-6055 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007326

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Abstract

To explore the acceptability of implementing an online tool for the assessment and management of childhood obesity (Computer-Assisted Treatment of CHildren, CATCH) in primary care. An uncontrolled pilot study with integral process evaluation conducted at three general practices in northwest London, UK (November 2012-April 2013). Families with concerns about excess weight in a child aged 5-18 years (n=14 children). Families had a consultation with a doctor or nurse using CATCH, which assessed child weight status, cardiometabolic risk and risk of emotional and behavioural difficulties and provided personalised lifestyle advice. Families and practitioners completed questionnaires to assess the acceptability and usefulness of the consultation, and participated in semistructured interviews which explored user experiences. The primary outcome was family satisfaction with the tool-assisted consultation. Secondary outcomes were practitioners' satisfaction, and acceptability and usefulness of the intervention to families and practitioners. The majority of families (86%, n=12) and all practitioners (n=4) were satisfied with the consultation. Participants reported that the tool was easy to use, the personalised lifestyle advice useful and the use of visual aids beneficial. Families and practitioners identified a need for practical, structured support for weight management following the consultation. The results of this pilot study indicate that an online tool for assessment and management of childhood obesity can be implemented in primary care, and is acceptable to patients, families and practitioners. Further development and evaluation of the tool is warranted.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Health Services Research and Policy
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Population Studies (1974-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
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PubMed ID: 26070794
Web of Science ID: 363479900042
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2210872

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