Effect of tea on blood pressure for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.


Yarmolinsky, J; Gon, G; Edwards, P; (2015) Effect of tea on blood pressure for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutrition reviews, 73 (4). pp. 236-46. ISSN 0029-6643 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuv001

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

Tea has been proposed as an antihypertensive agent for individuals with elevated blood pressure, yet the evidence for this has not been systematically reviewed to date. The aim of this review was to evaluate the effects of tea on blood pressure in individuals within the prehypertensive and hypertensive blood pressure ranges. The CENTRAL, PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched for all relevant studies published from 1946 to September 27, 2013. The selection criteria included randomized controlled trials of adults whose blood pressure was within hypertensive or prehypertensive ranges and in which the applied intervention was green or black tea; controls consisting of placebo, minimal tea intervention, or no intervention; and a follow-up period of at least 2 months. Two reviewers independently extracted data on participants, interventions, comparators, outcomes, and study design. Mean differences (MDs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were pooled to generate summary effect estimates. Meta-analyses of 10 trials (834 participants) showed statistically significant reductions in systolic blood pressure (MD -2.36 mmHg, 95%CI -4.20 to -0.52) and diastolic blood pressure (MD -1.77 mmHg, 95%CI -3.03 to -0.52) with tea consumption. Consumption of green or black tea can reduce blood pressure in individuals within prehypertensive and hypertensive ranges, although further investigation with studies of longer duration and stronger methodological quality is warranted to confirm these findings.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Maternal Health Group
PubMed ID: 26024546
Web of Science ID: 355080100003
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2197054

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
295Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item