Timing of Breastfeeding Initiation and Exclusivity of Breastfeeding During the First Month of Life: Effects on Neonatal Mortality and Morbidity-A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis


Khan, J; Vesel, L; Bahl, R; Martines, JC; (2015) Timing of Breastfeeding Initiation and Exclusivity of Breastfeeding During the First Month of Life: Effects on Neonatal Mortality and Morbidity-A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Maternal and child health journal, 19 (3). pp. 468-479. ISSN 1092-7875 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-014-1526-8

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to review the evidence on the effect of initiation of breastfeeding early after birth and of exclusive breastfeeding during the first month in reducing neonatal mortality and morbidity. We searched Cochrane and PubMed databases for all available papers addressing our review questions and identified eleven papers. Data were extracted using a standard abstraction form. Evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Meta-analysis was done using STATA 11.0. Early initiation of breastfeeding was associated with a reduced risk of neonatal mortality. Initiating breastfeeding after the first hour doubled the risk of neonatal mortality. Exclusively breastfed neonates had a lower risk of mortality and infection-related deaths in the first month than partially breastfed neonates. Exclusively breastfed neonates also had a significantly lower risk of sepsis, diarrhea and respiratory infections compared with those partially breastfed. The pooled evidence indicates that substantial benefits in reducing neonatal mortality and morbidity can be achieved with effective promotion of early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding during the first month of life.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
PubMed ID: 24894730
Web of Science ID: 349763800005
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2138198

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