Job strain and cardiovascular disease risk factors: meta-analysis of individual-participant data from 47,000 men and women


Nyberg, ST; Fransson, EI; Heikkilä, K; Alfredsson, L; Casini, A; Clays, E; De Bacquer, D; Dragano, N; Erbel, R; Ferrie, JE; Hamer, M; Jöckel, KH; Kittel, F; Knutsson, A; Ladwig, KH; Lunau, T; Marmot, MG; Nordin, M; Rugulies, R; Siegrist, J; Steptoe, A; Westerholm, PJ; Westerlund, H; Theorell, T; Brunner, EJ; Singh-Manoux, A; Batty, GD; Kivimäki, M; IPD-Work Consortium, ; (2013) Job strain and cardiovascular disease risk factors: meta-analysis of individual-participant data from 47,000 men and women. PLoS One, 8 (6). e67323. ISSN 1932-6203 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0067323

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Abstract

: Job strain is associated with an increased coronary heart disease risk, but few large-scale studies have examined the relationship of this psychosocial characteristic with the biological risk factors that potentially mediate the job strain - heart disease association.<br/> : We pooled cross-sectional, individual-level data from eight studies comprising 47,045 participants to investigate the association between job strain and the following cardiovascular disease risk factors: diabetes, blood pressure, pulse pressure, lipid fractions, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, obesity, and overall cardiovascular disease risk as indexed by the Framingham Risk Score. In age-, sex-, and socioeconomic status-adjusted analyses, compared to those without job strain, people with job strain were more likely to have diabetes (odds ratio 1.29; 95% CI: 1.11-1.51), to smoke (1.14; 1.08-1.20), to be physically inactive (1.34; 1.26-1.41), and to be obese (1.12; 1.04-1.20). The association between job strain and elevated Framingham risk score (1.13; 1.03-1.25) was attributable to the higher prevalence of diabetes, smoking and physical inactivity among those reporting job strain.<br/> : In this meta-analysis of work-related stress and cardiovascular disease risk factors, job strain was linked to adverse lifestyle and diabetes. No association was observed between job strain, clinic blood pressure or blood lipids.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Cardiovascular Diseases/*etiology/psychology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/etiology/psychology, Female, Humans, Male, Odds Ratio, Risk Factors, Stress, Psychological/*complications, Work/*psychology, Cardiovascular Diseases, etiology, psychology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, etiology, psychology, Female, Humans, Male, Odds Ratio, Risk Factors, Stress, Psychological, complications, Work, psychology
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Health Services Research and Policy
PubMed ID: 23840664
Web of Science ID: 322342800129
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2025531

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