Job strain in relation to body mass index: pooled analysis of 160 000 adults from 13 cohort studies


Nyberg, ST; Heikkilä, K; Fransson, EI; Alfredsson, L; De Bacquer, D; Bjorner, JB; Bonenfant, S; Borritz, M; Burr, H; Casini, A; Clays, E; Dragano, N; Erbel, R; Geuskens, GA; Goldberg, M; Hooftman, WE; Houtman, IL; Jöckel, KH; Kittel, F; Knutsson, A; Koskenvuo, M; Leineweber, C; Lunau, T; Madsen, IE; Hanson, LL; Marmot, MG; Nielsen, ML; Nordin, M; Oksanen, T; Pentti, J; Rugulies, R; Siegrist, J; Suominen, S; Vahtera, J; Virtanen, M; Westerholm, P; Westerlund, H; Zins, M; Ferrie, JE; Theorell, T; Steptoe, A; Hamer, M; Singh-Manoux, A; Batty, GD; Kivimäki, M; IPD-Work Consortium, ; (2011) Job strain in relation to body mass index: pooled analysis of 160 000 adults from 13 cohort studies. Journal of internal medicine, 272 (1). pp. 65-73. ISSN 0954-6820 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02482.x

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Abstract

: Evidence of an association between job strain and obesity is inconsistent, mostly limited to small-scale studies, and does not distinguish between categories of underweight or obesity subclasses.<br/> : To examine the association between job strain and body mass index (BMI) in a large adult population.<br/> : We performed a pooled cross-sectional analysis based on individual-level data from 13 European studies resulting in a total of 161 746 participants (49% men, mean age, 43.7 years). Longitudinal analysis with a median follow-up of 4 years was possible for four cohort studies (n = 42 222).<br/> : A total of 86 429 participants were of normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg m(-2) ), 2149 were underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg m(-2) ), 56 572 overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg m(-2) ) and 13 523 class I (BMI 30-34.9 kg m(-2) ) and 3073 classes II/III (BMI ≥ 35 kg m(-2) ) obese. In addition, 27 010 (17%) participants reported job strain. In cross-sectional analyses, we found increased odds of job strain amongst underweight [odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.25], obese class I (odds ratio 1.07, 95% CI 1.02-1.12) and obese classes II/III participants (odds ratio 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.28) as compared with participants of normal weight. In longitudinal analysis, both weight gain and weight loss were related to the onset of job strain during follow-up.<br/> : In an analysis of European data, we found both weight gain and weight loss to be associated with the onset of job strain, consistent with a 'U'-shaped cross-sectional association between job strain and BMI. These associations were relatively modest; therefore, it is unlikely that intervention to reduce job strain would be effective in combating obesity at a population level.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, *Body Mass Index, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Employment/*psychology, Europe/epidemiology, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity/epidemiology/psychology, Odds Ratio, Overweight/*epidemiology/*psychology, Stress, Psychological/*etiology, Weight Gain, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Body Mass Index, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Employment, psychology, Europe, epidemiology, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, epidemiology, psychology, Odds Ratio, Overweight, epidemiology, psychology, Stress, Psychological, etiology, Weight Gain
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Health Services Research and Policy
PubMed ID: 22077620
Web of Science ID: 305510600007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2025517

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