Investigation of relationships between Aedes aegypti egg, larvae, pupae, and adult density indices where their main breeding sites were located indoors.


Romero-Vivas, CM; Falconar, AK; (2005) Investigation of relationships between Aedes aegypti egg, larvae, pupae, and adult density indices where their main breeding sites were located indoors. J Am Mosq Control Assoc, 21 (1). pp. 15-21. ISSN 8756-971X

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Abstract

Aedes aegypti (L.) density indices obtained in a dengue fever (DF) endemic area were compared. One hundred and twenty premises, in an urban area of Colombia where dengue type-1 and type-2 virus cocirculated, were randomly selected and sampled for 7 months. The geometric mean monthly numbers (density index, DI) of Ae. aegypti eggs (ODI), 4th instar larvae (LDI), pupae (PDI), and adults (ADI) were calculated based on the use of ovitraps, nets, and manual aspirators, respectively. A negative temporal correlation was observed between the LDI and the ODI (r = -0.83, df = 5, and P < 0.01). Positive temporal correlations were only observed between the LDI and the PDI (r = 0.90, df = 5, and P < 00.5) and the Breteau and House indices (r = 0.86, df = 5, and P < 0.01). No other correlations were found between these indices and any of the other density indices or the incidence of suspected DF cases in residents, the temperature, the rainfall, or seasonal fluctuations. Our results were, therefore, probably due to the most productive Ae. aegypti breeding sites (large water containers) being located indoors within this study area. The number of adult female Ae. aegypti/person (n = 0.5) and pupae/person (n = 11) in our study area were lower and dramatically higher than the transmission thresholds previously reported for adult and pupae, respectively. Because there were confirmed DF cases during the study period, the transmission threshold based on the Ae. aegypti pupae was clearly more reliable. We found that the mean ovitrap premise index (OPI) was 98.2% during this study and that the mean larval (L-4th instars) premise index (LPI) was 59.2%, and therefore we suggest that the OPI and LPI would be more sensitive methods to gauge the effectiveness of A. aegypti control programs.

Item Type: Article
PubMed ID: 15825756
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/19768

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